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Gallery 8 Psuedomorphs & Mineral Oddites

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Quartz (modified by lightning), Diamantina, Minas Gerais, BrazilQuartz (modified by lightning), Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Q-504  Quartz (modified by lightning)  $95

Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil

14.4 x 4.6 x 4 cm

A very gemmy Quartz crystal that, inside the rock where it was formed, was submitted to a high electrical voltage created by lightning hitting the rock (not the Quartz crystal). Due to its piezoelectrical properties, the Quartz crystal submitted to this high voltage will expand or contract (depending on the signal of the electrical field, positive or negative). The result is a weird crack pattern that develops on the crystals faces of the Quartz. For many years, crystal miners in the Serra de Espinhaco Mountains of Brazil, where there are frequent thunderstorms, have reported finding these oddities. But only in the last 8-10 years have any, in limited quantities, been available to collectors. There is a paper about these type of crystals that was published by Prof. Joachim Karfunkel et. al., from University of Minas Gerais, who found the explanation for these weird crack patterns. You can read about it (in German) here: Link to article


Topaz pseudomorph after Orthoclase, Saubachriss, Muldenberg, Klingenthal, Vogtland, Saxony, GermanyTopaz pseudomorph after Orthoclase, Saubachriss, Muldenberg, Klingenthal, Vogtland, Saxony, GermanyTopaz pseudomorph after Orthoclase, Saubachriss, Muldenberg, Klingenthal, Vogtland, Saxony, Germany
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T-326  Topaz pseudomorph after Orthoclase  $95

Saubachriss, Muldenberg, Klingenthal, Vogtland, Saxony, Germany

6 x 4.8 x 3.9 cm

Here we have an example of one of the more elusive pseudomorphs from Europe. A twinned Orthoclase crystal measuring 4.8 centimeters in length, that has been completely replaced by Topaz. While is a small imperfection on one corner, this specimen is still considered an really good example of this material. Examples of this material are getting quite difficult to find these days.


Albite pseudomorph after Scapolite, Poudrette Quarry, Mont Saint-Hilaire, La Vallée-du-Richelieu RCM, Montérégie, Québec, CanadaAlbite pseudomorph after Scapolite, Poudrette Quarry, Mont Saint-Hilaire, La Vallée-du-Richelieu RCM, Montérégie, Québec, Canada
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F-269  Albite pseudomorph after Scapolite  $50
Ex R. Waddell, T. Fitzpatrick, R. Rizzo

Poudrette Quarry, Mont Saint-Hilaire, La Vallée-du-Richelieu RCM, Montérégie, Québec, Canada

5.3 x 3.6 x 2 cm

Here we have an example of Pink colored Albite that has replaced a group of Scapolite crystals. The pink Albite from Mont Saint-Hilaire are usually found as aggregates of bladed crystals and are much sought after by collectors. This uncommon example of pink Albite is somewhat of a rarity; I have only seen 2 other examples of this material. These specimens were recovered from 2 pockets near the entrance to the quarry on August 27, 1989 by Gilles Haineault. Specimens from this classic location are getting hard to come by as collecting is restricted to one or two field trips per year, to small groups (drawn by lottery) of members of the Club de Minéralogie de Montréal, under very strict rules.


Cassiterite in Kaolinite pseudomorph after Orthoclase, St Austell Mining District, Cornwall, England, UKCassiterite in Kaolinite pseudomorph after Orthoclase, St Austell Mining District, Cornwall, England, UK
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K-007  Cassiterite in Kaolinite pseudomorph after Orthoclase  $65
Ex R. Rizzo Collection

St Austell Mining District, Cornwall, England, UK

6.4 x 3.4 x 1.4 cm

An excellent double-terminated & tabular, Carlsbad-twinned Orthoclase crystal that has been pseudomorphed by Kaolinite. Embedded in this specimen numerous crystals of the tin oxide mineral, Cassiterite. Kaolinite pseudomorphs after Orthoclase from Cornwall are not particularly rare but those that are included by Cassiterite are few and far between and are highly prized.


Hydroxylapatite pseudomorph after Hemimorphite, Astillero Mine, Mapimi, Durango, Mexico
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H-079  Hydroxylapatite pseudomorph after Hemimorphite  $50

Astillero Mine, Mapimí, Municipio de Mapimí, Durango, Mexico

4.1 x 3.3 x 2.3 cm

Hydroxylapatite pseudomorphs after tabular hemimorphite blades are rare from this very obscure Mapimí area mine, near the famed Ojuela Mine. A sculptural dense cluster of bladed brown and tan-colored pseudomorphs is accented with a tan botryoid of Apatite. The large pseudomorph blade is 1.7 cm and the Apatite botryoid is 4 mm. A fascinating and rare pseudomorph combination. This material was mined in the 1960s.


Calcite, Droujba Mine, Djurkovo Complex, Laki, Laki Obshtina, Plovdiv Province, BulgariaCalcite, Droujba Mine, Djurkovo Complex, Laki, Laki Obshtina, Plovdiv Province, Bulgaria
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C-286  Calcite cast after Calcite  $35

Droujba Mine, Djurkovo Complex, Laki, Laki Obshtina, Plovdiv Province, Bulgaria

8 x 3.3 x 2.7 cm

A very interesting Eastern European specimen of Calcite. This scalenohedral crystal of Calcite is hollow and is a cast after, oddly enough, Calcite.


Tourmaline cast after Spodumene on Quartz, Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum, Nuristan Province, AfghanistanTourmaline cast after Spodumene on Quartz, Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum, Nuristan Province, AfghanistanTourmaline cast after Spodumene on Quartz, Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum, Nuristan Province, Afghanistan
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T-290  Tourmaline cast after Spodumene on Quartz  $90

Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum, Nuristan Province, Afghanistan

6.5 x 7 x 4.3 cm.

Here we present a differnt type of mineral specimen from Afghanistan for a change.  Resting against a cluster of clear Quartz crystals are the remains of 2 Spodumene crystals.  The Spodumene has been replaced by a myriad of needle-like, green crystals of Elbaite Tourmaline.  This specimen is quite attractive and would brighten up any mineral cabinet.


Hematite pseudomorph after Marcasite, White Desert, Farafra Oasis, EgyptHematite pseudomorph after Marcasite, White Desert, Farafra Oasis, Egypt
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H-070  Hematite pseudomorph after Marcasite  $65

White Desert, Farafra Oasis, New Valley Governorate, Egypt

5.1 x 4.5 x 4 cm.

These dramatic pseudomorphs were originally formed as Marcasite crystals on the ocean bottom.  These unusual specimens were later pseudomorphed to Hematite making for a very three-dimensional and attractive mineral specimen.  These radial bursts of crystals were found in the remote western desert of southwest Egypt and dug up by French dealer Alain Carion.  This find was made a number of years ago and I have not heard of any new material being found.


Chalcedony pseudomorph after Aragonite, Valle de las Plumas, Paso de Indios Department, Chubut, ArgentinaChalcedony pseudomorph after Aragonite, Valle de las Plumas, Paso de Indios Department, Chubut, Argentina
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Q-444  Chalcedony pseudomorph after Aragonite  $45

Valle de las Plumas, Paso de Indios Department, Chubut, Argentina

7 x 5.2 x 4.3 cm.

This stellate cluster of Aragonite crystals have been pseudomorphed by Quartz, included by Hematite which gives it its reddish tone.  So what you have is Quartz in the exact form of the prior Aragonite crystals, having preserved their form perfectly.  There is some translucence at the terminations of the crystals.  Once abundant, I don't see these for sale too often these days.


Chalcedony pseudomorph after Anhydrite,  Agua Fria River, New River Station area, Yavapai County, AZChalcedony pseudomorph after Anhydrite,  Agua Fria River, New River Station area, Yavapai County, AZ
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Q-451  Chalcedony pseudomorph after Anhydrite  $120

Agua Fria River, New River Station Area, Yavapai County, AZ

4.5 x 4.3 x 2.6 cm

These dramatic Chalcedony pseudomorphs after Anhydrite were collected over a period of 10 years by my friend, Al Rose. This material has the distinction of being mentioned not once but twice in The Mineralogical Record's what's new in minerals. Not many of these were found and are much sought after by collectors of Arizona minerals as well as by pseudomorph collectors.


Quartz on Hematite pseudomorph after Epidote, Bessemer Ridge, Green Mountain, King County, WAQuartz on Hematite pseudomorph after Epidote, Bessemer Ridge, Green Mountain, King County, WA
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Q-439  Quartz on Hematite pseudomorph after Epidote  $60

Bessemer Ridge, Green Mountain, King County, WA

6.6 x 2 x 1.7 cm.

The pseudomorph specimens from this location have always been one of my favorites. They consist of an Epidote crystal that has been entirely replaced with Hematite faithfully retaining its original form. A later generation of Quartz crystals then grew on the faces of the pseudomorph.  You almost never see these Quartz covered pseudomorphs offered for sale anymore.


Quartz psuedomorph after Feldspar, Erongo Mountain, Karibib, Erongo Region, NamibiaQuartz psuedomorph after Feldspar, Erongo Mountain, Karibib, Erongo Region, Namibia
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Q-447  Quartz pseudomorph after Orthoclase  $95

Erongo Mountain, Karibib, Erongo Region, Namibia

6.7 x 6.9 x 5.8 cm.

Being someone who has an appreciation for any mineral specimen that is out of the ordinary, I fell in love with these when I first saw them.  A majority of the combinations of mineral species that can be found in Erongo are quite abundant, it seems to me that Pseudomorphs are under represented at this famous location.  These never were very abundant and probably won't be in the future.  This specimen is a complete and total replacement of five Orthoclase crystals by tiny Quartz crystals with a green cast and some crystals of Smoky Quartz, one much, much bigger than the others.  This specimen lived in my collection until recently when I decided that I didn't need as many of these as I had accumulated.



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T-308  Schorl with Beryl inclusion  $60

Dara-i-Pech Pegmatite Field, Chapa Dara District, Konar Province, Afghanistan

2.8 x 2.4 x 2.5 cm.

Just when you think that you've seen it all from Afghanistan, there's this specimen   A lustrous crystal of Schorl that is include by a clear, colorless Beryl crystal.  The Beryl continues down the length of the specimen with a small portion protruding from the Schorl's bottom.  Another neat feature of this specimen are the pronounced and well-formed growth hillocks on its beveled termination.  I have sold a good amount of material from Afghanistan over the last 27 years and I have only seen one other specimen like this.


Quartz & Hematite pseudomorph after Calcite, Wölsendorf Fluorite Mining District, Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, GermanyQuartz & Hematite pseudomorph after Calcite, Wölsendorf Fluorite Mining District, Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, GermanyQuartz & Hematite pseudomorph after Calcite, Wölsendorf Fluorite Mining District, Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, Germany
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Q-485  Quartz & Hematite cast after Calcite & Barite  $95

Wölsendorf Fluorite Mining District, Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, Germany

9.3 x 7.7 x 7.2 cm

While not that common, every now and then you will see one of these Quartz after Calcite casts offered for sale. This specimen shows the scalenohedral form of the Calcite crystal that it has replaced as well as the form of the blade-like Barite crystals. The Quartz crystals on this specimen are included by Hematite which makes for a nice contrast of colors.


Amethyst epimorph after Calcite, Artigas, Artigas Department, UruguayAmethyst cast after Calcite, Artigas, Artigas Department, Uruguay
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Q-443  Amethyst cast after Calcite  $95

Artigas, Artigas Department, Uruguay

7.5 x 4.1 x 3.5 cm.

Here we have a complete all-around Amethyst cast after Calcite.  This specimen consists of a tower of numerous medium-purple Amethyst crystals.  If you look up the bottom of the specimen you will see the sharp, pseudohexagonal form of the dissolved Calcite crystal.  The Calcite was completely etched away by corrosive solutions in the pocket, leaving the Amethyst.  These specimens are one of nature's better looking mineral oddities.


Colemanite pseudomorph after InyoiteColemanite pseudomorph after Inyoite
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C-278  Colemanite pseudomorph after Inyoite  $75

Boron, Kramer District, Kern County, CA

12.8 x 9.4 x 6.8 cm

A dramatically formed pseudomorph of Colemanite after a very large Inyoite crystal from Boron, California. This pseudomorph is shaped like a big, 3-dimensional "checkmark", when viewed at the proper angle and proudly rests on a clayey matrix. The pseudomorph and matrix surface are uniformly covered with lustrous, white, 3-4 mm, colemanite crystals. Although contacted in several areas, this is an important example of this material. This is rare material. I have only seen perhaps 5-6 examples of these pseudomorphs in over 30 years of collecting.


Gonnardite replacing Hauyne, Sar-e-Sang River, Sar-e Sang, Koksha Valley, Badakhshan Province, AfghanistanGonnardite replacing Hauyne, Sar-e-Sang River, Sar-e Sang, Koksha Valley, Badakhshan Province, AfghanistanGonnardite replacing Hauyne, Sar-e-Sang River, Sar-e Sang, Koksha Valley, Badakhshan Province, Afghanistan
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G-126  Gonnardite replacing Haüyne  $80

Sar-e-Sang River, Sar-e Sang, Koksha Valley, Badakhshan Province, Afghanistan

6.7 x 5.3 x 3.5 cm.

This specimen will play tricks on your eyes; depending on the light source it will look blue, blue-green or almost green-colored.  The white patches are where the blue-colored Haüyne crystals have been replaced by the zeolite mineral, Gonnardite. Some of the crystals on this specimen are well-formed and some of them seem to have been almost totally dissolved.  When these specimens first came out they were sold as Lazurite replacing Plagioclase. Closer examination and much testing has proven the blue & blue-green mineral to be Haüyne. To be real Lazurite, it must be sulfide dominant and none have ever been found to be, so all "Lazurite" is Haüyne.



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Q-477  interference Quartz  $45

Bor Pit, Dal'negorsk B Deposit, Dalnegorsk, Primorsky Krai, Russia

7.6 x 2.4 x 2 cm

An unusually-shaped, translucent, colorless Quartz crystal known as “interference”Quartz from the famous Bor Pit at Dalnegorsk, Russia. These crystals are unique to the Bor Quarry.  The Quartz crystal growth was interrupted by Calcite, as evidenced by stacked, poker chip-looking section in the middle of the crystal. This unique piece is complete all-around, with only slight contacting on the bottom termination.



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AD-180  Chalcedony pseudomorph after Barite  $40

The Poison Strip, Thompsons District, Grand County, UT

4.8 x 3.4 x 3.6 cm

A striking nodule of yellow & red Chalcedony that has replaced the mineral, Barite. Specimens from this location are usually not as well-formed as the one before you. Hard to come by material.


Pyrite pseudomorph after Pyrrhotite with Boulangerite,  Noche Buena Mine, Municipio de Mazapil, Zacatecas, Mexico
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P-080  Pyrite pseudomorph after Pyrrhotite with Boulangerite  $45

Noche Buena Mine, Municipio de Mazapil, Zacatecas, Mexico

7 x 5 x 3.1 cm.

These specimens are striking in person, and this piece is no exception. This specimen features foliated, semi-"rose"-esque Pyrrhotites that have been replaced by shimmering metallic golden-colored Pyrite.  Topping things off is a layer of fibrous Boulangerite crystals.


Fluorite & Barite, Moffat Tunnel, Cripple Creek District, Teller County, ColoradoFluorite & Barite, Moffat Tunnel, Cripple Creek District, Teller County, Colorado
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F-237  Fluorite & Barite  $200

Moffat Tunnel, Cripple Creek District, Teller County, Colorado

6.6 x 4.5 x 2.3 cm.

This specimen is from a small find made a few years back.  This specimen consists of lustrous, lilac-purple Fluorite cubes covering intersecting sprays of flattened, elongated, white Barite.  The Barite is thought to be epimorphs after Laumontite. The contrasting colors make for a very aesthetic specimen. The perceived color of these Fluorites varies depending on the color temperature of the lighting that it is viewed under.  This find was documented on Season 4, Episode 4 of the television show, Prospectors.


Lepidolite pseudomorph after Tourmaline, Itinga, Minas Gerais, BrazilLepidolite pseudomorph after Tourmaline, Itinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil
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L-035  Lepidolite pseudomorph after Tourmaline  $50

Itinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil

6 x 2.2 x 1.5 cm.

A very lustrous specimen of Lepidolite replacing Tourmaline.  Traces of green-colored Tourmaline can be seen on closer examination.  This specimens is an “old timer” that was found in the 1970's.


Chrysocolla & Malachite pseudomorph after Azurite, Lupoto Mine, Kakumba, Kipushi, Katanga, Democratic Republic of the CongoChrysocolla & Malachite pseudomorph after Azurite, Lupoto Mine, Kakumba, Kipushi, Katanga, Democratic Republic of the Congo
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C-247  Chrysocolla & Malachite pseudomorph after Azurite  $145

Lupoto Mine, Kakumba, Kipushi, Katanga, Democratic Republic of the Congo

6.7 x 6.3 x 5.4 cm.

Here we have a striking and colorful specimen of needle-like groups of medium-blue Chrysocolla which has overgrown pseudomorphs of Malachite after Azurite on a gossan matrix.  I think these fairly new specimens from Lupoto are quite attractive based upon not only their fantastic color, but the fact that there are at least three generations of mineralization here.  Initially the piece consisted of prismatic Azurite crystals, which were replaced by Malachite, and then a final generation of Chrysocolla came over the top. The largest individual pseudomorph measures 3centimeters.  They are also pretty cool-looking due to the numerous spikes of Chrysocolla that protrude from the specimen like so many cactus needles.


Hematite pseudomorph after Siderite on Microcline, Lake George, Park County, Colorado
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H-073  Hematite pseudomorph after Siderite on Microcline  $50

Lake George, Park County, CO

4 x 3.9 x 2.6 cm.

This magnificent, as far as pseudomorphs are concerned, mineral specimen was found around 15 years ago by friends of mine from southern California while on vacation in Colorado.  Being a collector of pseudomorphs myself, I am greatly impressed by the faithful replacement of the Siderite by the Hematite.  Most pseudomorphs do not retain such an exact form of the mineral species that they have replaced.  The Hematite pseudomorphs are perched on a crystal of Microcline making for a nice contrast of colors.



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Q-468  Quartz var. Eisenkiesel on Fluorite var. Stink-Fluss  $50

Johannesschacht Mine, Schwarzach bei Nabburg, Wölsendorf East District
Wölsendorf Fluorite Mining District, Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, Germany

6.6 x 5.4 x 6.1 cm

Here we have an example of iron-included Quartz, known in German as “Eisenkiesel”. The Quartz crystals sit on a matrix of coarsely-crystalized Fluorite, variety “Stink-Fluss”. Stink-Fluss is a variety of Fluorite, especially from Wölsendorf, Germany, that emits an odor and ozone upon grinding due to the internal presence of free fluorine and calcium and the interaction of those components with water upon grinding. Despite its name it won't stink up your mineral cabinet. An unusual pair of mineral oddities. Several of the quartz points show a little wear but do not detract from the specimen's appearance.



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A-119  Aragonite stalactite section  $30

Wheeler Peak, White Pine County, NV

7 x 5.8 x 5.5 cm

Here we have a polished section of an Aragonite stalactite from a remote location from the easternmost part of central Nevada.

 


Barite pseudomorph after Calcite, Taouz, Er Rachidia Province, Meknès-Tafilalet Region, MoroccoBarite pseudomorph after Calcite, Taouz, Er Rachidia Province, Meknès-Tafilalet Region, Morocco
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C-135  Calcite peudomorph after Barite  $25

Taouz, Er Rachidia Province, Meknès-Tafilalet Region, Morocco

5.6 x 3.1 x 3.5 cm.

Here we are offering a really neat specimen; a stalactite-like stack of interpenetrating crystals of Calcite as large as 2.2 cm.  that have replaced the mineral Barite.  The contrast between the sand color and the orange-red portions of this mineral specimen make for interesting specimen.



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E-031  Epididymite and Natrolite  $50

Poudrette Quarry, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Montérégie, Québec, Canada

5.1 x 6.1 x 6.4 cm.

An unusual example of a cavernous cluster of Epididymite crystals. This specimen exhibits an extremely unusual habit for the mineral Epididymite which is present as opaque, blocky pseudohexagonal crystals up to 7.5 mm. covering a formation that appears to be a cast after another undetermined mineral. Whatever the reason for the formation of this unique specimen, I think that it is a must-have for any collector of Mont Saint-Hilaire specimens.



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L-038  Lepidolite, Quartz & Cookeite pseudomorph after Elbaite Tourmaline  $120

Coronel Murta, Minas Gerais, Brazil

14.2 x 6.1 x 4.6 cm

A magnificent example of the replacement of one mineral species by another.  This specimen features an Elbaite Tourmaline that has mostly been replaced by Lepidolite with just a few small areas of green where the Tourmaline was not replaced set in a vug of cookeite that encased the original Tourmaline.  Also present in the cookeite “shell” are well-formed crystals of Quartz.


Malachite pseudomorph after Azurite, Morenci, Copper Mountain District, Greenlee County, AZMalachite pseudomorph after Azurite, Morenci, Copper Mountain District, Greenlee County, AZ
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M-062  Malachite pseudomorph after Azurite  $35

Morenci, Copper Mountain District, Greenlee County, AZ

2.7 x 1.7 x 1.5 cm

A classic Morenci Malachite pseudomorph after Azurite.  This well-formed pseudomorph is a deep green color and is covered by a jacket of lighter colored Malachite.


Goethite pseudomorph after Siderite, Gourrama, Errachidia Province, Meknès-Tafilalet, Morocco
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G-097  Goethite pseudomorph after Siderite  $40

Gourrama, Errachidia Province, Meknès-Tafilalet, Morocco

7.5 x 5 x 3.5 cm.

This lustrous and very well-formed pseudomorph specimen features crystals measuring up to 2.5 cm.  I have seen a lot of Moroccan minerals over the years, but have only encountered several of these pieces.  Pseudomorphs usually tend to be at least a little bit crude looking.  This is not the case for this specimen, as it faithfully retains the the shape of the of the Siderite crystals that have been replaced by the mineral, Goethite.  This is a very attractive mineral specimen despite it being a pseudomorph and black in color.


Pyrite pseudomorph after Pyrrhotite with Calcite, Noche Buena Mine, Municipio de Mazapil, Zacatecas, MexicoPyrite pseudomorph after Pyrrhotite with Calcite, Noche Buena Mine, Municipio de Mazapil, Zacatecas, Mexico
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P-029  Pyrite pseudomorph after Pyrrhotite with Calcite  $40

Noche Buena Mine, Zacatecas, Mexico

7 x 5.5 x 6 cm.

Here we have a classic mineral specimen from a long defunct location.  This mound of Pyrrhotite crystals has been replaced by Pyrite, after which a second generation of cubic Pyrite and Calcite crystals formed on top of that.  Specimens from this location are not often seen these days.


Kaolinite pseudomorph after Orthoclase, Melbur China Clay Pit, Melbur, St Stephen-in-Brannel, Cornwall, England, UKKaolinite pseudomorph after Orthoclase, Melbur China Clay Pit, Melbur, St Stephen-in-Brannel, Cornwall, England, UK
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K-006  Kaolinite pseudomorph after Orthoclase  SOLD
Ex R. Rizzo, J.P. Gliddon Collection

Melbur China Clay Pit, Melbur, St Stephen-in-Brannel, Cornwall, England, UK

5.3 x 3.6 x 1.2 cm

This specimen is a Cornish classic. This pseudomorph consists of a well-formed, complete Carlsbad-twinned Orthoclase crystal that has been completely replaced by Kaolinite and Sercite. The latter being a fine-grained whitish mica, mainly Muscovite.

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