MINERAL SPECIMENS FOR SALE ~ Cal  Neva Mineral Company
   
 

New Mineral Specimens

Updated January 24th, 2020

 
 


Amethyst, Kakamunurle Mine, Karur District, Tamil Nadu, IndiaAmethyst, Kakamunurle Mine, Karur District, Tamil Nadu, India
click on image for larger view

Q-516  Amethyst  $200

Kakamunurle Mine, Karur District, Tamil Nadu, India

12.2 x 7 x 1.7 cm

A fan-like aggregate of glassy, deeply-colored, grape-purple Amethyst crystals. This specimen has a good lustre, is translucent-transparent and is complete all around with only the bottom portion being contacted. Large specimens from this small find in 2005 are not common.


Ruby, Jegdalek Ruby Deposit, Surobi District, Kabul, Afghanistan
click on image for larger view

C-293  Corundum variety Ruby  $70

Jegdalek Ruby Deposit, Surobi District, Kabol Province, Afghanistan

6 x 5 x 4.1 cm

An specimen of Ruby on matrix. The Ruby crystal on this specimen measures 1.3 cm and is translucent. The color of this Ruby is very pleasing to the eye and fluoresces violently when exposed to direct sunlight.


Quartz with Smectite inclusions, Wana, South Waziristan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, PakistanQuartz with Smectite inclusions, Wana, South Waziristan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan
click on image for larger view

Q-517  Quartz with Smectite inclusions  $45

Wana, South Waziristan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

5.3 x 4.5 x 3.2 cm

A very three-dimensional and lustrous example of skeletal Quartz. This specimen is a complete all-around floater. The brownish colored Smectite inclusions are are a result of pocket clay that was incorporated in the Quartz as it was crystallizing. Where there are no inclusions, the Quartz crystals are water-clear, and have sharp, glassy surfaces all the way around.


Quartz pseudomorph after Andradite, Garnet Hill Mine, Garnet Hill, Calaveras County, CaliforniaQuartz pseudomorph after Andradite, Garnet Hill Mine, Garnet Hill, Calaveras County, California
click on image for larger view


Quartz pseudomorph after Andradite, Garnet Hill Mine, Garnet Hill, Calaveras County, CaliforniaQuartz pseudomorph after Andradite, Garnet Hill Mine, Garnet Hill, Calaveras County, California
click on image for larger view

Q-518  Quartz pseudomorph after Andradite  $85

Garnet Hill Mine, Garnet Hill, Calaveras County, CA

7.3 x 7 x 3 cm

Here we have an excellent example of one of the more uncommon pseudomorphs; a large single crystal of Andradite that has been almost totally replaced by Quartz. The Quartz crystals are mostly clear and terminated. The small amount of Epidote on this specimen adds a little contrasting color. Garnet Hill has long been known as a source of fine Garnet and Epidote crystals.


Fluorite, Tongbai County, Nanyang, Henan, China
click on image for larger view

F-272  Fluorite  $80

Tongbai County, Nanyang, Henan, China

12 x 8.9 x 2.9 cm

This specimen consists of mounds of yellow Fluorite that have formed hundreds of blocky euhedral crystals on top of purple-colored Fluorite causing it to appear a deeper amber color. This specimen is complete with just a little bit of contacting on the edges and has a good lustre as well. These gorgeous and unusual Fluorite specimens caused quite a sensation in 2007 when they first appeared. Compared to the myriad of Fluorites that are available from China, there were very few of these to go around and they are much sought-after by collectors.


Fluorite, Tongbai County, Nanyang, Henan, China
click on image for larger view

F-273  Fluorite  $65

Tongbai County, Nanyang, Henan, China

13 x 9.5 x 3.1 cm

This specimen consists of mounds of yellow Fluorite that have formed hundreds of blocky euhedral crystals on top of purple-colored Fluorite.This specimen mounds of yellow Fluorite that have formed hundreds of blocky euhedral crystals on top of purple-colored Fluorite causing it to appear a deeper amber color. This specimen has has a good lustre with no damage, just contacting on the edges. These gorgeous and unusual Fluorite specimens caused quite a sensation in 2007 when they first appeared. Compared to the myriad of Fluorites that are available from China, there were very few of these to go around and they are much sought-after by collectors.


Pyrite, American Aggregates Corp. Quarry, Indianapolis, Marion County, IndianaPyrite, American Aggregates Corp. Quarry, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana
click on image for larger view

P-096  Pyrite  $50

American Aggregates Corp. Quarry, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

3.6 x 3.5 x 3.1 cm

A complete-all-around, slightly oblate sphere of Pyrite crystals from a small find in the early 1990's. This spherical aggregate is composed of octahedral and modified cubic crystals of Pyrite. These pyrite nodules occurred in the lower New Albany Shale, just above the contact with the underlying North Vernon Limestone, Devonian age. According to Huizing and Russell (1986, p. 148), the cause of nucleation of these specimens is uncertain.


Chalcedony, Chalcedony Beds, San Rafael Area, San Rafael Mining District, Emery County, Utah
click on image for larger view

AD-225  Chalcedony  $35

Chalcedony Beds, San Rafael Area, San Rafael Mining District, Emery County, UT

9.5 x 8.5 x 4.2 cm

A vividly-colored example of Coprolite from eastern Utah. In other words, fossil poop. This example has inclusions which are very important to Paleoscatologists. By studying the physical composition of Coprolites, paleontologists can deduce whether the animal that produced it was most likely a carnivore, herbivore or omnivore. Traces of organic particles can help researchers determine what an animal ingested, which in turn helps determine where and when the animal lived. Seeds, spores, pollen, wood, grass, leaves, even microorganisms and parasites, can be preserved within a coprolite. The word “coprolite” comes from the Greek words Kopros Lithos, meaning “dung stone”.


Apophyllite, Calcite and Natrolite, Bergen Hill, Hudson County, New Jersey
click on image for larger view

A-120  Apophyllite, Calcite & Natrolite  $70
Ex. Richard Kosnar

Bergen Hill, Hudson County, NJ

13 x 11.6 x 4.9 cm

This specimen is comprised of translucent, light golden color Calcite scalenohedra which are associated with white blocky Apophyllite crystals and small acicular "sprays" of Natrolite on matrix. The locality at Bergen Hill dates back to the 19th Century, and some of the most classic of all New Jersey Trap Rock specimens have been found around this area.


Smithsonite on Coronadite, Broken Hill Proprietary Mine, Broken Hill, Yancowinna County, New South Wales, AustraliaSmithsonite on Coronadite, Broken Hill Proprietary Mine, Broken Hill, Yancowinna County, New South Wales, Australia
click on image for larger view

S-170  Smithsonite on Coronadite  $450
Ex. Dawn & Jim Minette #S60

Broken Hill Proprietary Mine, Broken Hill, Yancowinna County, New South Wales, Australia

31.5 x 12.1 x 8.7 cm

A jumbo-sized specimen of the Mn oxide, Coronadite, liberally encrusted with colorless to white crystals of the Zn carbonate, Smithsonite. The Smithsonite on this specimen is mostly of the “rice grain” habit and occurs as single crystals measuring up to 6mm and in clusters. Specimens such as this one are quite old as Coronadite was common in the upper oxidized zone of this renowned deposit. This specimen was acquired in 1967 by Jim Minette. this specimen was part of the Jim Minette Memorial Exhibit at the 2002 East Coast Gem & Mineral show. Smithsonite is named after British mineralogist and chemist, James Smithson, who bequeathed the funds that made possible the founding of the Smithsonian Institution.


Topaz, Khoroshiv, Zhytomyr Oblast, UkraineTopaz, Khoroshiv, Zhytomyr Oblast, Ukraine
click on image for larger view


Topaz, Khoroshiv, Zhytomyr Oblast, UkraineTopaz, Khoroshiv, Zhytomyr Oblast, Ukraine
click on image for larger view

T-341  Topaz  $550

Khoroshiv (Volodarsk-Volynskii), Zhytomyr Oblast, Ukraine

7 x 5.7 x 3.7 cm

A water clear, gemmy crystal of Topaz from an old and famous pegmatite district. Khoroshiv (formerly Volodarsk-Volynskii) is noted for the excellent Beryl and Topaz crystals that occur in huge pockets (chamber pegmatites). This gemmy specimen is a complete crystal with no damage. Topaz is much less common than Beryl from this location.This specimen features geometric etch patterns on the sides that are classic Khoroshiv.


Topaz pseudomorph after Augelite with Quartz, Mundo Nuevo Mine, Mundo Nuevo, Huamachuco, Sanchez Carrion Province, La Libertad, PeruTopaz pseudomorph after Augelite with Quartz, Mundo Nuevo Mine, Mundo Nuevo, Huamachuco, Sanchez Carrion Province, La Libertad, Peru
click on image for larger view

T-342  Topaz pseudomorph after Augelite with Quartz  $50

Mundo Nuevo Mine, Mundo Nuevo, Huamachuco, Sanchez Carrion Province, La Libertad, Peru

3.1 x 2.7 x 2 cm

A highly unusual cast pseudomorph from a small pocket found probably around 2012. This is a cast of sparkly transparent Topaz crystals that formed over a large Augelite. This specimen is complete except for one quartz crystal whose termination is absent. It amazes me that such fragile hollow casts can survive the mining after having been in the earth for millions of years.


Lepidolite pseudomorph after Tourmaline, Itinga, Minas Gerais, BraziLepidolite pseudomorph after Tourmaline, Itinga, Minas Gerais, BraziLepidolite pseudomorph after Tourmaline, Itinga, Minas Gerais, Brazi
click on image for larger view

L-041  Lepidolite pseudomorph after Tourmaline  $60

Itinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil

5.5 x 3 x 2.8 cm

A very lustrous and translucent specimen of Lepidolite replacing Tourmaline. This specimen has good color, a good lustre and is the best of a lot of around 50 specimens that I acquired many years ago. This “old timer” is from a find in the 1970's.


Amethyst, Maquar, Zarkashan Mountain, Qarabagh District, Ghazni, AfghanistanAmethyst, Maquar, Zarkashan Mountain, Qarabagh District, Ghazni, AfghanistanAmethyst, Maquar, Zarkashan Mountain, Qarabagh District, Ghazni, Afghanistan
click on image for larger view

Q-519  Amethyst  $35

Maquar, Zarkashan Mountain, Qarabagh District, Ghazni, Afghanistan

6.8 x 3.5 x 2.7 cm

A transprent-translucent crystal of Amethyst that is capped with an overgrowth of clear Quartz. Between the two layers of quartz is a green-colored mineral that I was told to be Chlorite. I'm not so sure of that it is as it reminds me more of something from the amphibole supergroup of minerals. Interesting material from a small find made 8-9 years ago.


Acanthite, San Juan de Rayas Mine, Guanajuato, Municipio Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Mexico
click on image for larger view

A-121  Acanthite  $70

San Juan de Rayas Mine, Municipio Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Mexico

2.5 x 1.8 x 2.3 cm

An uncommonly large crystal of the silver sulfide mineral, Acanthite. This specimen has a hoppered, in-drawn termination. Guanajuato has been called “the treasure house of Mexico” and at one time produced three-fifths of the world's silver. Mining in this district dates back to the Aztecs in the 13th century.


Hematite pseudomorph after Marcasite, White Desert, Farafra Oasis, New Valley Governorate, EgyptHematite pseudomorph after Marcasite, White Desert, Farafra Oasis, New Valley Governorate, Egypt
click on image for larger view

H-091  Hematite pseudomorph after Marcasite  $40

White Desert, Farafra Oasis, New Valley Governorate, Egypt

4 x 3.2 x 3 cm

These dramatic pseudomorphs were originally formed as Marcasite crystals on the ocean bottom. These unusual specimens were later pseudomorphed to Hematite making for a very three-dimensional and attractive mineral specimen. These radial bursts of crystals were found in the remote western desert of southwest Egypt and dug up by French dealer Alain Carion. This find was made a number of years ago and I have not heard of any new material being found.


Hematite, Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais, BrazilHematite, Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais, Brazil
click on image for larger view

H-092  Hematite  $50

Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais, Brazil

7 x 5.8 x 2.4 cm

Crystals of Hematite to 1.7 cm on a massive Hematite matrix. The sharply formed and lustrous crystals have a pseudocubic form. I had to photograph this specimen at an oblique angle to cut down on glare caused by light reflecting off of the crystal faces.


Almandine, Rodolita Mine, Fazenda Rodolita, Peixe, Tocantins, BrazilAlmandine, Rodolita Mine, Fazenda Rodolita, Peixe, Tocantins, Brazil
click on image for larger view

G-160  Almandine  $150

Rodolita Mine, Fazenda Rodolita, Peixe, Tocantins, Brazil

7.8 x 7.4 x 6 cm

A large specimen of Almandine from Brazil. This highly lustrous specimen has some areas of cranberry-red gemminess next to nearly opaque dark cherry-red. The crystal is a complete floater and weighs 744 grams or 1.6 pounds. When these Garnets were first found in Tocantins, they were found weathering out of the soil in a melon field. Despite the abundance of Garnets that are mined every year, specimens are hard to come by as almost all of the mine's production is shipped to China to be carved.


Emerald, Pomba Pit, Serra das Éguas, Brumado, Bahia, BrazilEmerald, Pomba Pit, Serra das Éguas, Brumado, Bahia, BrazilEmerald, Pomba Pit, Serra das Éguas, Brumado, Bahia, Brazil
click on image for larger view

B-240  Emerald  $80

Pomba Pit, Serra das Éguas, Brumado, Bahia, Brazil

8.2 x 1.6 x 1.4 cm

This specimen is one of the largest beryl crystals that I have seen from this location. This crystal has some small areas that are nearly clear with a rich, green hue. The crystal is complete all around with a small area of contact on its lower portion. The Brumado area is best known for the large Magnesite crystals that occur there as well as for vividly colored Uvite & stunning reddish pink Topaz crystals. this specimen is from a find from 12-13 years ago.


Aquamarine, Padre Paraíso, Minas Gerais, BrazilAquamarine, Padre Paraíso, Minas Gerais, Brazil
click on image for larger view

B-241  Aquamarine  $40

Padre Paraíso, Minas Gerais, Brazil

5.1 x .9 x .6 cm

A very clear Aquamarine with a light blue color and a hollow center that has been filled with pocket clay. This crystal is much clearer the the photos convey. Oddly, unlike almost all of the beryl found at this location, this crystal is not etched at all.


Quartz, Diamantina, Minas Gerais, BrazilQuartz, Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil
click on image for larger view

Q-520  Quartz (modified by lightning)  $45

Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil

10.9 x 3.5 x 2.6 cm

A very gemmy Quartz crystal that, inside the rock where it was formed, was submitted to a high electrical voltage created by lightning hitting the rock (not the Quartz crystal). Due to its piezoelectrical properties, the Quartz crystal submitted to this high voltage will expand or contract (depending on the signal of the electrical field, positive or negative). The result is a weird crack pattern that develops on the crystals faces of the Quartz. For many years, crystal miners in the Serra de Espinhaco Mountains of Brazil, where there are frequent thunderstorms, have reported finding these oddities. But only in the last 8-10 years have any, in limited quantities. been available to collectors. There is a paper about these type of crystals that was published by Prof. Joachim Karfunkel et. al., from University of Minas Gerais, who found the explanation for these weird crack patterns. You can read about it (in German) here: Link to article


Sapphire, Beitbridge District, Matabeleland South, ZimbabweSapphire, Beitbridge District, Matabeleland South, Zimbabwe
click on image for larger view

C-294  Corundum variety Sapphire  $30

Beitbridge District, Matabeleland South, Zimbabwe

4.6 x 3.7 x 3 cm

A blue-gray crystal of Sapphire with a little bit of Biotite. This crystal has some lustre and is complete except for a small area of contact. I am told that the mine collapsed some time ago and there are no plans to re-open it.

If, like me, you are a fan of Corundum; check out this website: The Corunduminium


Microcline, Tawara, Hirukawa, Nakatsugawa City, Gifu, JapanMicrocline, Tawara, Hirukawa, Nakatsugawa City, Gifu, Japan
click on image for larger view

F-274  Microcline  $40

Tawara, Hirukawa, Nakatsugawa City, Gifu, Japan

7.5 x 2.2 x 2.1 cm

A well-formed, columnar, Baveno-twinned Feldspar crystal with a modified termination. The crystal is complete with the exception of a small contact on the bottom rear portion.


Sulphohalite, Searles Lake, San Bernardino County, CaliforniaSulphohalite, Searles Lake, San Bernardino County, California
click on image for larger view

S-171  Sulphohalite (type locality)  $45

Searles Lake, San Bernardino County, CA

2.5 x 2.2 x 2.1 cm

A natural grayish yellow to brownish yellow Sulphohalite crystal cluster having octahedral form. This crystal is complete all around.


Elbaite, Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum Pegmatite Field, Du Ab District, Nuristan, AfghanistanElbaite, Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum Pegmatite Field, Du Ab District, Nuristan, Afghanistan
click on image for larger view

T-343  Elbaite  $40

Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum Pegmatite Field, Du Ab District, Nuristan, Afghanistan

6 x 4.4 x 2.4 cm

A pod or concretion of finely crystallized, mint-green-colored Tourmaline.


Morganite and Kunzite on Quartz, Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum Pegmatite Field, Du Ab District, Nuristan, AfghanistanMorganite and Kunzite on Quartz, Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum Pegmatite Field, Du Ab District, Nuristan, Afghanistan
click on image for larger view

B-242  Morganite (fluorescent) and Kunzite on Quartz  $125

Mawi Pegmatite, Nilaw-Kolum Pegmatite Field, Du Ab District, Nuristan, Afghanistan

9.6 x 7.6 x 7.6 cm

A specimen of Kunzite that is pierced by a crystal of faintly-colored Morganite on a matrix of Quartz crystals. The Kunzite and the Morganite are complete, while the Quartz has a few dings on the backside of the specimen. This specimen was part of a parcel of matrix specimens from Afghanistan that I purchased years ago and had been sitting packed away with several other average looking specimens that came with their better looking brothers. It was only recently that I discovered that all of the Morganite specimens from this lot were fluorescent. Fluorescent beryl is quite rare. The Morganite on this specimen fluoresces a very good blue-white hue under SWUV illumination. The Kunzite has average magenta colored fluorescence under both LW & SWUV illumination.


Triphane, Dara i Pech Pegmatite Field, Chapa Dara District, Kunar, AfghanistanTriphane, Dara i Pech Pegmatite Field, Chapa Dara District, Kunar, AfghanistanTriphane, Dara i Pech Pegmatite Field, Chapa Dara District, Kunar, AfghanistanTriphane, Dara i Pech Pegmatite Field, Chapa Dara District, Kunar, Afghanistan
click on image for larger view

S-172  Spodumene variety Triphane (fluorescent)  $80

Dara-i-Pech Pegmatite Field, Chapa Dara District, Kunar, Afghanistan

6.5 x 2.9 x 1.8 cm

A well-formed crystal of Triphane with almost no etching. This specimen is much clearer than the photos convey. This crystal has a faint golden-yellow hue but when illuminated by LWUV it exhibits a very strong neon-orange fluorescence.


Sanidine, Itrongay, Mahasoa Est, Betroka, Anosy, Madagascar.Sanidine, Itrongay, Mahasoa Est, Betroka, Anosy, Madagascar.
click on image for larger view


Sanidine, Itrongay, Mahasoa Est, Betroka, Anosy, Madagascar.Sanidine, Itrongay, Mahasoa Est, Betroka, Anosy, Madagascar.
click on image for larger view

F-275  Sanidine  $225

Itrongay, Mahasoa Est, Betroka, Anosy, Madagascar

4.6 x 4.5 x 3.7 cm

A good sized, and complete crystal of Sanidine. This specimen has a pleasing yellow color and is mostly transparent to translucent with several internal fractures. Most of the crystal is only lightly etched, the exception being the rear faces. Most of the Sanidine crystals from Itrongay are river tumbled, broken or so heavily etched that they retain none of their original form. For many years these yellow Feldspars were sold as Orthoclase but investigation done in 2002 determined that they were in fact Sanidine. The finest gem crystals of Sanidine are produced in this region of Madagascar.